Saturday, February 8, 2020

Shakespeare's Othello Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Shakespeare's Othello - Essay Example Desdemona’s father’s assumption that she will marry a handsome man of his choice proves wring. He never imagined that his daughter is an individual of independent opinions. She tells Brabantio how she loves Othello and gives perfect logic for her action. Desdemona is proud of her beauty and believes that she can influence men easily, and this is an indication that she is not a mature woman. Lovers who are easily won over are also easily lost and as such that type of love is not true love but infatuation. Even though Desdemona is an attractive young woman, she is stubborn when it comes to her own interest and she will cross any loyalty to go by her inclinations. Her talk with her father is intelligently presented, she is respectful to him, she feels obliged to him on many counts, but makes it clear that her loyalties have changed with the time. She understands the reason for her father’s wrath and yet her decision to leave him is final. Reason is enemy number one of love and love will ambush reason at the most unexpected time. When Desdemona’s father was thinking that his daughter is absolutely loyal to him, she had perfected her alternative plans tactfully but boldly. She had fallen for Othello and would not like to lose time in cementing the relationship. In this context she devises a plan in pursuit of love which would not have occurred in a woman’s mind belonging to the 21st century. Desdemona pleads with Othello to find a friend to woo her by telling the stories related to his valor. This means that she was encouraging Othello to court her directly. Iago blows hot and cold into the relationships of her father and Othello. His intentions are not sincere and he wears the mask of a well-wisher and counselor of Desdemona. Just for loving Othello, Desdemona cannot be condemned. In the conventional societal norms of the

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Sports Facility Improvement Essay Example for Free

Sports Facility Improvement Essay The need for a clear and prioritised framework for future investment in sports facility provision is particularly critical given the likely need for additional provision as a result of population growth in the District, and specifically in the St Neots area, and the need for ongoing investment in the existing infrastructure. Given the nature of the District, which is a combination of the four main towns of Huntingdon, Ramsey, St Neots and St Ives, smaller villages and more rural areas there is also a need to ensure that sports facilities are accessible throughout the District. The development of the sports facilities strategy also provides the opportunity to assess the condition of existing provision, and whether it is appropriate to meet local needs and demand and to ensure that potential new provision helps to address any current deficiencies – quantitative or qualitative. In addition, there is a need to ensure that the appropriate quantity and quality of facilities are provided to facilitate increased participation (Government agenda), and improve the health of the local community. There are two main factors which are particularly relevant to the future provision of sports facilities; these are the future implementation of the Building Schools for the Future Programme (BSF) in the District, and the significant area of population growth around St Neots. This strategy will be used to guide and inform the nature and extent of resources, financial and operational, which are needed to ensure that Huntingdonshire has up to date, fit for purpose, accessible and welcoming sports facilities for the existing community, people working in, or visiting the District, and any new residents in the District. The Sports Facilities Strategy for Huntingdonshire ‘fits’ within the strategic framework for planning for future provision as follows: Creating Active Places (Regional Framework) Cambridgeshire County Sports Facilities Strategy (County Framework) Huntingdonshire Sports Facilities Strategy (local priorities responding to local needs and issues) Strategy Scope The focus of this strategy is indoor sports facilities (swimming pools, sports halls, health and fitness facilities, indoor bowls), and Artificial Turf Pitches (ATPs). The Strategy considers existing and planned facilities incorporating: †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ Local authority leisure centres Voluntary sector sports clubs Private sector facilities Secondary schools that will be re-built or re-furbished under PFI or the Building Schools for the Future (BSF) programme It is important to stress that this strategy focuses on community sports facility provision and the needs for provision both now and into the future. The District also has a significant sporting infrastructure which includes provision for activities such as golf, sailing etc, and a large number of individual sports clubs. These are very important to facilitate increased participation, and encourage people to become involved in activity on a regular basis. Strategy Drivers The key drivers for the Strategy are: †¢ †¢ The need to plan strategically and ensure sustainability of future provision The Local Development Framework (LDF), and Supplementary Planning Documents setting out expectations for S106 contributions from developers towards current and future sports facility provision i Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Executive Summary March 2008 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ The priorities and objectives for the Sustainable Community Strategy The need to identify what provision is needed in St Neots given the significant population increases planned for this area of the District The need to identify how best to provide for those living in rural areas, where accessibility to sports facilities is more limited The need to increase participation at local level Opportunities for partnerships – Building Schools for the Future (BSF) Schools, National Governing Bodies (NGBs), Sports Clubs etc. N. B The feedback from NGBs reflects that gained in the development of ‘Creating Active Places’ and the Cambridgeshire County Strategy. This approach to the future strategic planning of sports facilities will continue to be important for the District given a number of significant factors at local level, such as: PARTICIPATION LEVELS †¢ The current high levels of participation in sport and physical activity in the District over 50% of all Huntingdonshire residents aged 16+ participate in physical activity (participation is higher in Huntingdonshire than in England) †¢ The Hinchingbrooke School Sports Partnership is now established, and working towards the targets set for the provision of 2 hours of PE for children under 16 plus 2/3 hours of participation in after school sports and physical activity HEALTH CHALLENGES †¢ Relatively high incidences of cancer †¢ Growing incidence of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) †¢ Relatively high numbers of people smoking (1 in 5) †¢ The rate of admissions to hospital with alcohol specific conditions is less than the England average †¢ The need to ensure that obesity, especially amongst young people, reduces †¢ The opportunity to harness the social aspects of sport and physical activity to address issues f social isolation †¢ The opportunity for active participation to contribute to maintaining higher life expectancy for the District’s population than the England average PLANNING ISSUES †¢ The need to ensure investment in future provision of sports facilities, and the potential to achieve this through identification of priorities which inform the Local Development Framework (LDF) POPULATION GROWTH †¢ Significant growth in population in and around St Neots, to the south of the District †¢ The need to develop Local Standards of provision to inform and guide future S106 contributions from developers District Profile Hunti ngdonshire is a rural area with four main settlements. Although no more than 12 miles apart in terms of distance, the nature of the district means that accessibility to community provision, including sports facilities, is a challenge. Current sports facility provision is situated in each of the main settlements to overcome this issue. There is a need to consider how those living in the rural areas can best be provided with participative opportunities. Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Executive Summary March 2008 ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The District is relatively affluent, but has small pockets of deprivation. There are high levels of employment and average wages are higher than other parts of the county, although some younger people lack formal qualifications. Life expectancy is high, and compared to some of the other more rural and urban areas, there are fewer serious health issues, with the exception of a growing incidence of CHD, and relatively high rates of cancer, experienced by the population. The District has a large younger population, and a high proportion of 30-44 year olds; this profile is important for sports provision, as individuals tend to be more active when younger. Based on the Active People Survey (Sport England December 2006), adult (ie those aged over 16 years) participation rates in sport and physical activity are higher than the rates at national level. The level of participation relates to taking part in 30 minutes of physical activity at least 3 times a week. Sports facility provision in the District is well thought of (comment in Huntingdonshire Cultural Strategy 2007), but there is a continuing need for capital investment just to maintain the Council’s existing five leisure centres. There are potential partnership opportunities for new provision through the education sector, and also linked to the growth agenda. Current and Future Demand Supply and Demand Analysis It is important to stress that this assessment is based on national models which identify the level of provision needed for a current and future level of population ie what level and type of sports facility provision is needed to provide adequately for a specific number of people. To make this more relevant at local level, the modeling then identifies the actual level of accessible sports facility provision ie that which is available on a pay and play basis; this highlights the fact that there are built facilities in the District that are not fully accessible for community use. This situation, which is common across the UK would suggest that the way forward is about a combination of opening up existing sports facilities to ensure there is greater community access, and developing new facilities where appropriate, but particularly to address the District’s growth agenda eg in the St Neot’s area. Current Demand Table 1 Supply and Demand Analysis 2008 Facility Type Swimming Pools Sports Halls (4 badminton court size) Required Level of Supply (based on 2007 population of 168,200 (2004 based population Government Actuary Department data, published October 2007) 1756. 67 sq m Current Level of Provision Current Level of Accessible Provision (based on accessibility for pay and play usage) 688 sq m Surplus (+)/Deficit (_) of accessible provision (based on 212 sq m being 1 x 4 lane x 25m pool) -1068. 67 sq m (equivalent to 5. 1 x 4 lane x 25m pools) 32. 3 (equivalent to 8 x 4 badminton court sports halls) N. B 3 court halls at Sawtry and Ramsey Leisure Centres not included in above figure) 223 stations +5 -3 938 sq m (of 25m x 4 lane pools and above) 35 courts (4 badminton court halls and above) 48. 26 badminton courts 16 badminton courts (4 + courts) Fitness Stations Indoor Bowls All weather turf pitches (ATPs) 433 stations (based on 12% participation rate (FIA)) 9. 28 rinks 7 (based on 1 ATP :25,000 population) 561 14 rinks 4 210 stations 14 4 Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Executive Summary March 2008 iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Impact of Increased Population and Participation Table 1 above illustrates the current supply and demand analysis for Huntingdonshire. In terms of strategic planning for future provision of sports facilities, it is important to consider the impact of both an increased population, and increased participation (modeled at a 13 %overall increase, ie ! % per annum, over the life of the strategy). Table 2 overleaf models the impact of both increased population and increased participation on demand for facility provision. Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Executive Summary March 2008 iv EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Table 2 Increased Population (to 2021) and Participation Impact Facility Type Required Level of Supply by 2021 (based on 2021 population of 188,400 (2004 based population Government Actuary Department data, published October 2007)) 2,066. 02 sq m (9. 7 x 4 lane x 25m pools (212 sq m)) 56. 5 badminton courts (14. 1 x 4 badminton court sports halls) 678 stations 10. 4 8 Current Level of Provision (2007) Current Level of Accessible Provision (based on accessibility for pay and play usage) 688 sq m (of 25m x 4 lane pools and above) 16 badminton courts (4 + courts) Impact of 13 % increase in Participation over the life of the strategy i. e. to 2021, (based on 2007 population) in terms of facility requirements 2,211. 63 sq m (10. 43 x 4 lane x 25m pools (212 sq m)) 60. 75 badminton courts (equivalent to 15. 2 sports halls of 4 badminton court size) 468 (based on a 0. 5% increase year on year, which is the current trend) +4 rinks 7. 7 Swimming Pools Sports Halls (4 badminton court size) Fitness Stations Indoor Bowls ATPs 938 sq m (of 25m x 4 lane pools and above) 35 courts (4 badminton court halls and above) 561 14 rinks 4 210 stations 14 4 Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Executive Summary March 2008 v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Analysis of Supply and Demand Swimming Pools It is clear that in relation to current demand for sports facilities, there is an existing deficiency in provision of swimming pools, sports halls, fitness stations, and ATPs when supply and demand modeling is based on accessibility of facilities. However, the overall deficit in terms of current ie 2008 swimming pool provision (-1,068. 67 sq m/5. x 4 lane x 25m pools) is not actually a true reflection of the existing swimming provision in Huntingdonshire District, given that 2 of the main public pools are excluded from the SFC modelling on the basis that they are not 25m in length. The pools at Sawtry Leisure Centre and Ramsey Leisure C entres are only 20m in length. In addition, the learner pool at St Neots Leisure Centre is only 20m long. The impact of including this water space in the supply and demand assessment reduces the deficit to 578. 67 sq m (2. 7 4 lane x 25m pools) in 2008, and 858. 19 sq m (4. 1 4 lane x 25m pools) by 2021. Despite the fact that the three pools above are less than 20m in length, they provide very important and well-used facilities for the local community, and therefore should be adequately reflected in assessing current supply of swimming pools. The reduction in deficit is also important as this facilitates consideration of the extensive commercial pool provision in the District, which, while not being accessible to many of the population because there is a requirement to pay a membership fee, quite obviously does provide for a percentage of the local community, who can, or who choose to, afford this membership fee. Therefore in relation to the current level of provision, it is considered that the deficit of 5. 1 4 lane x 25m pools (which equates to 2. 5 8 lane x 25m pools) is adequately addressed by other local provision of water space. This is through the commercial facilities, and also swimming pools at three other local schools – Godmanchester, Hinchingbrooke, and Kimbolton. It is also important to stress that the existing HDC pools do not currently operate at full capacity; this is due to a number of factors including accessibility, quality and condition. Whilst dual-use facilities provide significant potential for effective operational management because they are used for both curriculum delivery and community use, access is restricted during the day to the community. This means that potential users may choose to access other provision they know is open, or they may not swim at all. A further factor is that dual-use facilities have intensive use because they are used for curriculum delivery and community use and therefore over time this can impact on their quality and condition. Although there are significant pockets of deprivation in the District, Huntingdonshire is a relatively affluent area which is reflected by the level of commercial sports facility provision in the towns; given the possible perceived accessibility issues with HDC facilities local residents may be choosing to swim at these facilities, or elsewhere, rather than in HDC facilities. Having examined the possible reasons for the fact that HDC swimming pools do not currently operate at full capacity, it is critical to stress that this current position does not provide a reason not to provide the level of water space required in the District in the future. In terms of future deficits in water space, it is predominantly the growth in population, and specifically that around the St Neots area, that increases demand, and therefore demonstrates a deficit. If the same argument is applied as above, the actual deficit in future supply of water space is (6. 5 4 lane x 25m pool – 5. 1 4 lane x 25m pool), which equates to 1. 4 of a 4 lane x 25m pool. On this basis, it is suggested that there will be a need to provide 1 additional 6 lane x 25m pool, possibly on the site of the new secondary school to be developed in St Neots, to cater for the growth in population. It is important to state that the supply and demand modelling above is based on a level of supply to provide for a number of people; whilst adult participation rates are high in the District existing pools are ot always full to capacity, which indicates that people take part in a range of activities other than swimming. However, the assessment of supply and demand clearly shows t hat pay and play accessibility is an issue in relation to quality water space in the District, and this is likely to be exacerbated by the growth in population. Demand for swimming will increase, and there will be a need for additional provision in St Neots by 2021. Given the specific location of the majority of the District’s future growth ie east of the railway line in St Neot’s, there is potential to consider the provision of a new swimming pool alongside other community facilities. Given the scale of the residential development, it is likely that there will be a new secondary school in this area and co-location (not dual-use) of a swimming facility on the same site may provide a practical option for future provision. Co-location is suggested to address some of the previously identified factors associated with accessibility to dual-use provision. Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Executive Summary March 2008 vi EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Sports Halls There is almost sufficient actual sports hall in the District at the present time; the issue is that all existing facilities are not available on a pay and play basis (only 16 of the total existing 49 courts (all courts in the District) are available for pay and play access). Opening up community pay and play access at existing facilities is a priority, before any additional facilities are built. In 2008, there would be no deficit in sports hall provision if if accessibility is improved at those facilities where community access is currently limited, and all existing courts were available for pay and play access.. By 2021, this sufficiency has decreased to 7. 75 courts ie nearly 2 x 4 badminton court sports hall, if it is again assumed that existing hall accessibility is improved, and all courts in the District are accessible for pay and play usage. The provision of two additional sports halls, one, potentially at St Neots, would be required to address this deficit. Given the comments from the clubs in relation to ccessing existing public sports hall provision, and the existing deficit in accessible provision, there is a need to retain existing levels of sports hall in the District, and indeed seek to open up additional facilities. The proposals to extend fitness suites at Huntingdon and St Neots Leisure Centres will actually reduce existing accessible pay and play sports hall provision, and therefore increase the identified deficit moving forward. Health and Fitness In terms of fitness stations, there are currently sufficient fitness stations in the District, across all providers to meet community demand; the same is true by 2021. It is the accessibility to this provision that is the critical issue, given that a significant level of existing facilities is operated commercially. However, there are also public facilities operated by HDC and other facilities available on Kimbolton and Hinchingbrooke Schools; the challenge is to ensure that these facilities operate pricing policies which are inclusive, whilst reflecting the need to levy a membership fee to facilitate health and safety controls in terms of access. Only members who have passed an induction are allowed to use fitness facilities. Indoor Bowls There is sufficient current supply of indoor bowls rinks to meet both current and future need (to 2021). Current provision is located centrally in Huntingdon and in St Neots and is within 20-30 minutes drivetime of the rest of the District. ATPs There is a need to provide additional ATPs to meet both current and future demand. additional facilities are required in the District now, which should be full size, floodlit, and be either sand based (principally for hockey, given that there is a general lack of such surfaces on the outskirts of Cambridge, which means the City is inundated with demand for hockey, which it currently struggles to accommodate), or if demand for additional football can be demonstrated, 3G. By 2021 there is a need for 4 additional ATP facilities. Given that there are three planned developments of new ATP facilities in the next 12 months in the District, in reality there will be a deficit of just one ATP by 2021. In developing new ATP provision, it will be important to address the current spatial deficiencies of this type of facility in the north of the District. The implementation of BSF may provide the opportunity to address this deficit in eg Sawtry. Key Issues and Challenges Based on the analysis of current provision, and the district context, there are a number of emerging key issues and challenges to be considered in developing the Huntingdonshire Sports Facilities Strategy. These include: †¢ †¢ Current deficits in provision, which will only increase as the local population increases; increasing participation will also have an impact on the demand for supply of swimming, sports hall and fitness station provision which is already insufficient, due to both quantitative and accessibility deficiencies. Facility condition ongoing investment in the existing HDC facilities to maintain and improve provision. Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Executive Summary March 2008 vii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ Facility Design – the design of some existing facilities could be improved to meet the needs of the local population, and specifically the needs of users with a disability. It is also important to consider alternative forms of provision, or perhaps less traditional type facilities, particularly to appeal to younger participants, where participation rates are lower in the District. Population Growth – this rapid growth over the next few years will increase the demand levels for sports facilities, particularly in and around St Neots. Drive to increase participation given the current Government targets for increasing participation in sport and physical activity, and the existing high activity rates in the District, the continued provision of accessible, fit for purpose and quality sports facilities is a clear priority for HDC and its stakeholder partners Increasing Participation amongst Younger People ie 16-34 years – given that this group has low levels of active participation in sport and physical activity, it is important to ensure that future provision reflects, and responds to, their needs Accessibility eg school facilities, daytime pools, sports halls; it is outside the control of HDC to open up school sites for community use. This approach needs to be undertaken in partnership with the County Council. Commercial sector provision – there is a significant level of commercial health and fitness provision in the District, some of which is of a better quality than the public sector facilities, however, it is not always accessible to those more deprived communities due to the cost of membership fees Strategic Recommendations Based on the analysis and findings of the sports facility strategy, the following recommendations are made in terms of future sports facility provision in the District: Recommendation 1 The priorities for future sports facility provision are accepted as: Current Needs †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ The theoretical deficiency in accessible water space; this can be addressed by increasing access to existing pool facilities on education sites and those operated commercially The deficiency in accessible sports hall provision; this could be addressed by opening up and extending community pay and play access to existing facilities, predominantly on school sites. The future implementation of BSF may also be an important factor in this in the future. The need to retain, not lose existing sports hall space operated through the public sector. The need to ensure fitness provision is accessible ie affordable, through appropriate partnerships with the commercial sector, pricing and programming policies The provision of additional ATPs (3 planned) and specifically the deficit of this type of facility in the north of the District. Future Needs †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ The theoretical deficiency in accessible water space; this can be addressed by increasing access to existing pool facilities on education sites and those operated commercially The deficiency in accessible sports hall provision; this could be addressed by opening up and extending community pay and play access to existing facilities, predominantly on school sites. The future implementation of BSF may also be an important factor in this in the future. The need to ensure fitness provision is accessible ie affordable, through appropriate partnerships with the commercial sector, pricing and programming policies The provision of 1 additional ATP and specifically the deficit of this type of facility in the north of the District. The need for 1 additional swimming pool in the St Neots area as a result of significant population growth. Facility condition ongoing investment in the existing HDC facilities to maintain and improve provision. Facility Design – the design of some existing facilities could be improved to meet the needs of the local population, and specifically the needs of disability users. Population Growth – this rapid growth over the next few years will increase the demand levels for sports facilities, particularly in and around St Neots. There are a number of options to consider in addressing the need for new sports facilities in St Neots including their co-location with other community provision eg a new secondary school. viii Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Executive Summary March 2008 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY †¢ †¢ †¢ Drive to increase participation given the current Government targets for increasing participation in sport and physical activity, and the existing high inactivity rates in the District, the continued provision of accessible, fit for purpose and quality sports facilities is a clear priority for HDC and its stakeholder partners Accessibility eg school facilities, daytime pools, sports halls Commercial sector provision – there is a significant level of commercial health and fitness provision in the District, some of which is of a better quality than the public sector facilities, however, it is not always accessible to those more deprived communities due to cost Recommendation 2 Increasing Access Given that there are actually sufficient sports hall facilities in the District to meet demand, but they are not all accessible, the option of negotiating increased community access should also be considered as a priority. Recommendation 3 BSF Given the identified deficiencies in pay and play accessible sports facility provision across the District it is recommended that opportunities for partnership with BSF, FE/HE and other strategic partners are supported by HDC to maximise participation opportunities for the Huntingdonshire community. The opportunities through BSF are particularly important for the north of the District. Recommendation 4 Local Standards The following Local Standards for future core community sports facility provision are adopted by HDC: Quantity Table 3 Local Standards of Provision FACILITY TYPE Sports Hall (4 badminton Court) Swimming Pool (4 lane x 25m) Fitness Stations(20+ gym) Indoor Bowls ATPs Local Standards of Provision per 1000 population 51. 20 sq m 10. 96 sq m 3. 6 stations 0. 05 rink 0. 04 ATPs (based on 1 pitch (100m x 64m per 25,000 population) Quality The future standard of provision for new facilities should be: †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ The sports facilities are to be designed to a minimum playing standard of ‘fit for purpose’ depending on the terminology of the various national governing sporting bodies and Sport England Guidance. External elevations to utilise high quality, low maintenance finishes, and be sympathetic to the surrounding environment. Finishes being robust and suitable for location and use. Building fabric and services to be cost effective with low maintenance. First major maintenance to structure to be 50 years. Life expectancy of materials used to external elevations to be 25 years minimum (excluding routine maintenance). Sustainable, being responsible to environmental issues in terms of the use of energy and non-sustainable resources and the control of pollution. Use of environmentally friendly and sustainable building services and building materials to be maximised. Materials to be recyclable where possible. Services to be essentially economic and environmentally friendly, which allow cost in use to be minimised. The use of natural ventilation to be maximised. Full life cycle cost analysis will be required when considering the building fabric and services Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Executive Summary March 2008 ix EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Accessibility †¢ New sports facility provision should be located within a 20 minute walk time of its immediate catchment area, and where possible, should be linked to existing community provision eg education site All sports facility provision should be within a 20 minute drive time of its surrounding catchment area, and where possible and appropriate, depending on the nature of provision, should be located adjacent to other community provision, to facilitate access and reduce the overall need for travel around the District Recommendation 5 Retention of Sports Hall Space Given the lack of accessible sports hall provision in the District, it is recommended that careful consideration be given to reducing the available pay and play space further, unless other arrangements are made to increase access at other existing facilities. Recommendation 6 Partnership It is recommended that HDC seek to work in partnership wherever possible to address the identified deficiencies in sports facility provision. Key partners at local level will be education, local sports clubs, health services, NGBs and programmes such as BSF. This approach reflects HDC’s role as an enabler at local level. Recommendation 7 St Neots Area The opportunities and options for delivering new sports facilities in the growth area around St Neots need to be carefully considered, to ensure new facilities complement and do not compete with, existing HDC provision. HDC should seek to work in partnership, particularly with education, in the development of new sports facilities to facilitate co-located provision at the heart of the new community. Funding options to deliver the new facilities include growth area funding, S106, HDC capital, a private sector partnership and potentially external grant support. Recommendation 8 Participation in Sport and Physical Activity The provision of opportunities for participation in sport and physical activity across the District should be supported as a key priority given its potential to contribute positively to improved health, reduced obesity and social inclusion. Given the increasing issue of CHD, youth obesity, and the high level of smoking in the District, the role that active participation can play in improving health is critical. Appropriate resources should continue to be made available to improve awareness of provision, increase accessibility and deliver sport development programmes to increase and retain participation. Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Executive Summary March 2008 x SECTION I INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND Introduction 1. Strategic Leisure Limited (Strategic Leisure) was appointed by Sport England East in June 07 to develop a County Sports Facility Strategy for Cambridgeshire, covering Peterborough City Cou ncil, Huntingdonshire District (parts of) and Fenland District. SLL was asked to develop this work given the research and analysis undertaken to prepare the regional Sports Facilities Strategy (‘Creating Active Places’), which has informed this strategy. This draft strategy covers the analysis and findings relating to Huntingdonshire District sports facility provision. This strategy will be incorporated into the final County Sports Facility Strategy, together with the analysis for Peterborough and Fenland, and the update of the Cambridgeshire Horizons Report (2006) (Major Sports Facilities Strategy). 1. 2 1. 3 Rationale for the Huntingdonshire Sports Facilities Strategy 1. Huntingdonshire District Council (HDC) identified the need for a sports facility strategy to assist in guiding the future provision of a range of sports facilities in the District. The need for a clear and prioritised framework for future investment in sports facility provision is particularly critical given the likely need for additional provision as a result of population growth in the District, and specifically in the St Neots area, and the need for ongoing investment in the existing infrastructure. The development of the sports facilities strategy also provides the opportunity to assess the condition of existing provision, and whether it is appropriate to meet local needs and demand and to ensure that potential new provision helps to address any current deficiencies – quantitative or qualitative. In addition, there is a need to ensure that the appropriate quantity and quality of facilities are provided to facilitate increased participation (Government agenda), and improve the health of the local community. It is important to stress that this strategy focuses on community sports facility provision and the needs for provision both now and into the future. The District also has a significant sporting infrastructure which includes provision for activities such as golf, sailing etc, and a large number of individual sports clubs. These are very important to facilitate increased participation, and encourage people to become involved in activity on a regular basis. Given the nature of the District, which is a combination of the four main towns of Huntingdon, Ramsey, St Neots and St Ives, smaller villages and more rural areas there is also a need to ensure that sports facilities are accessible throughout the District. There are two main factors which are particularly relevant to the future provision of sports facilities; these are the future implementation of the Building Schools for the Future Programme (BSF) in the District, and the significant area of population growth around St Neots. This strategy will be used to guide and inform the nature and extent of resources, financial and operational, which are needed to ensure that Huntingdonshire has up to date, fit for purpose, accessible and welcoming sports facilities for the existing community, people working in, or visiting the District, and any new residents in the District. 1. 5 1. 1. 7 1. 8 1. 9 1. 10 Strategy Scope 1. 11 1. 12 The focus of this strategy is indoor sports facilities (swimmin g pools, sports halls, health and fitness facilities, indoor bowls), and Artificial Turf Pitches (ATPs). . The Strategy considers existing and planned facilities incorporating: †¢ †¢ †¢ Local authority leisure centres Voluntary sector sports clubs Private sector facilities Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Draft Report March 2008 1 SECTION I INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND †¢ Secondary schools that will be/are being re-built or re-furbished under PFI or the Building Schools for the Future (BSF) programme Strategy Drivers 1. 3 The key drivers for the Strategy are: †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ The need to plan strategically and ensure sustainability of future provision The Local Development Framework (LDF), and Supplementary Planning Documents setting out expectations for S106 contributions from developers towards current and future sports facility provision The priorities and objectives for the Sustainable Community Strategy The need to identify what provision is needed in St Neots given the significant population increases planne d for this area of the District The need to identify how best to provide for those living in rural areas, where accessibility to sports facilities is more limited The need to increase participation at local level Opportunities for partnerships – Building Schools for the Future (BSF) Schools, National Governing Bodies (NGBs), Sports Clubs etc. N. B The feedback from NGBs reflects that gained in the development of ‘Creating Active Places’ and the Cambridgeshire County Strategy. 1. 4 This approach to the future strategic planning of sports facilities will continue to be important for the District given a number of significant factors at local level, such as: PARTICIPATION LEVELS †¢ The current high levels of participation in sport and physical activity in the District over 50% of all Huntingdonshire residents aged 16+ participate in physical activity (participation is higher in Huntingdonshire than in England) †¢ The Hinchingbrooke School Sports Partnership is now established, and worki ng towards the targets set for the provision of 2 hours of PE for children under 16 plus 2/3 hours of participation in after school sports and physical activity HEALTH CHALLENGES †¢ Relatively high incidences of cancer †¢ Growing incidence of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) †¢ Relatively high numbers of people smoking (1 in 5) †¢ The rate of admissions to hospital with alcohol specific conditions is less than the England average †¢ The need to ensure hat obesity, especially amongst young people, reduces †¢ The opportunity to harness the social aspects of sport and physical activity to address issues of social isolation †¢ The opportunity for active participation to contribute to maintaining higher life expectancy for the District’s population than the England average POPULATION GROWTH †¢ Significant growth in population in and around St Neots, to the south of the District Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Draft Report March 2008 2 SECTION I INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND PLANNING ISSUES †¢ The need to ensure investment in future provision of sports facilities, and the potential to achieve this through identification of priorities which inform the Local Development Framework (LDF) The need to develop Local Standards of provision to inform and guide future S106 contributions from developers Huntingdonshire District – A Profile 1. 15 Huntingdonshire is a rural area o f nearly 350 sq miles and is located within the County of Cambridgeshire. Historically it was a county in its own right. The population is around 168,200 with half living in the four market towns of Huntingdon (population 19,910), St Neots (population 26,230), St Ives (population 15,860) and Ramsey (population 6,070), with the remaining residents distributed within key settlements and rural villages. The District has two rivers running through it, the River Great Ouse through the market towns (except Ramsey) and the River Nene to the north. The Districts market towns and villages reflect the areas history associated with both Roman and Anglo Saxon settlements. The District has excellent transport links to the A1 and A14, which in turn links to the M1, M11, and M6. The District has a high level of out-commuting at around 35%. The council along with other districts, county council, EEDA and GO East is part of the local ‘infrastructure partnership’ to deliver the Government’s sustainable communities plan in the Cambridge sub region. Huntingdonshire’s current strategies look at addressing the negative effects of isolation ensuring that all residents, irrespective of their location, can access culture and cultural services. The majority of housing and economic growth has been, and will continue to be, located within the district’s largest towns of Huntingdon and St Neots, although HDC has also planned development in other market towns such as St Ives and Ramsey. 1. 16 1. 17 1. 18 1. 19 1. 20 Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Draft Report March 2008 3 SECTION I INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND 1. 21 The map below shows the District and its main population settlements: Summary 1. 22 Huntingdonshire is a rural area with four main settlements. Although no more than 12 miles apart in terms of distance, the nature of the district means that accessibility to community provision, including sports facilities, is a challenge. Current sports facility provision is situated in each of the main settlements to overcome this issue. There is a need to consider how those living in the rural areas can best be provided with participative opportunities. Sports facility provision in the District is well thought of (comment in Huntingdonshire Cultural Strategy 2007), but there is a continuing need for capital investment just to maintain the Council’s existing five leisure centres. There are potential partnership opportunities for new provision through the education sector, and also linked to the growth agenda. 4 1. 23 Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Draft Report March 2008 SECTION II –STRATEGIC CONTEXT National Context 2. The national context which informs the overall need for a strategic approach to the future planning of sports facilities at local level is summarised in Table 1, Appendix 3; this demonstrates the Government priorities in relation to health, physical activity and increa sing participation. Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Draft Report March 2008 5 SECTION II –STRATEGIC CONTEXT Local Context Review of Strategic Documents 2. 2 The local context for the development of the sports facility strategy is summarised below. Given the clear focus on improving health and overall quality of life in the District, there is potential for provision of sport and physical activity to play a key role in contributing to the achievement of these local objectives. Local Authority Huntingdonshire District Council Strategic Document Huntingdonshireâ€Å"Growing successCorporate Plan 2007/8† Vision / Main Aim(s): The Council’s Vision is for Huntingdonshire to become a place where future generations have a good quality of life and enjoy: †¢ Continued economic success †¢ Opportunities for all †¢ An environment that is protected and improved The Council’s aims for the community are: †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ A clean, green and attractive place Housing that meets the local need Safe, vibrant and inclusive communities Healthy living Access to services and transport A strong diverse economy Key Priorities Priorities stemming from these aims: Community: †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ Enable provision of affordable housing Achieve low level of homelessness Lower carbon emissions Improve access to Council services Promote healthy lifestyle choice Promote development opportu nities in and around market towns Enhance public, community and specialist transport into and around the market towns Other Relevant Info Council: †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ Make performance management more effective and transparent Re-balance saving and spending to ensure resources are available to achieve council priorities Reduce number of car journeys to work by employees Build new operations centre and headquarters Be an employer people want to work for. The Council’s Corporate Aims are: †¢ Improve systems and practices †¢ Learn and develop †¢ Maintain sound finances Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Draft Report March 2008 6 SECTION II –STRATEGIC CONTEXT Local Authority Huntingdonshire District Council Strategic Document Open Space, Sport Recreation Needs Assessment Audit (August 2006) Vision / Main Aim(s): Section 7 – Outdoor Sports Key Priorities Overview of findings:†¢ Overall, the most common travel method for visiting outdoor sports facilities is walking (50. 1%), followed by car 38. 8%. The most frequent travel time to the facility was between five and ten minutes (37%), followed by between 11 and 14 minutes (29%). Consultation highlights that there is a relatively even distribution of outdoor sports facilities across the district, with a large proportion owned and managed by Parish Councils. The majority of use of the outdoor sports facilities within Huntingdonshire District is by formal clubs, and there is relatively little casual use of pitches. Provision of tennis and bowls within Huntingdonshire is predominately focused around the club structure, with most facilities in club ownership or leased to clubs. Consultation suggests that access to training facilities is a key issues, with only limited slots available at synthetic pitches for clubs wishing to train midweek. Other Relevant Info The Cambridge sub-region is the fastest growing area in the country. This significant increase in population will have far reaching consequences and will place demands on infrastructure and capacity of local services e. g. health services, transport and leisure facilities. †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ Section 8 – Playing Pitch Strategy The key areas of this part of the study included:†¢ Analysing the current level of pitch Overall, the research methods outlined identified 237 playing pitches in the District (all known public, private, school and other pitches). They compromise: †¢ 88 adult football pitches Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Draft Report March 2008 7 SECTION II –STRATEGIC CONTEXT Local Authority Strategic Document Vision / Main Aim(s): provision within the District †¢ Assisting the Council in meeting playing pitch requirements †¢ Providing information for decision-making and future development proposals All calculations covered the following sports – association football, rugby, cricket, and hockey Key Priorities †¢ 54 junior football pitches †¢ 14 mini soccer pitches †¢ 43 cricket pitches †¢ 7 adult rugby pitches †¢ 7 junior rugby pitches †¢ 1 junior rugby league pitch †¢ 7 adult grass hockey pitches †¢ 19 synthetic turf pitches Research showed that Huntingdonshire has a good number of football, cricket and hockey pitches for formal adult use in comparison to the national average. Huntingdonshire Cultural Strategy 2007 2010 To enhance the quality of life and ensure that all of Huntingdonshire’s residents have the opportunity to pursue a wide range of highquality, sustainable cultural activities that fully reflect the diverse needs of the district THEME 1 Improve access to culture and leisure opportunities THEME 2 Develop and improve life-long learning THEME 3 Develop vibrant communities which are safer, healthier, cohesive and economically sustainable Other Relevant Info Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Draft Report March 2008 8 SECTION II –STRATEGIC CONTEXT Local Demographic Profile 2. 2 A review of local demographics is important to: †¢ †¢ †¢ 2. 3 Assess whether local facilities, often built some time ago, are located in the right place in relation to key population settlements Identify where there is likely to be population growth and additional demand for facilities Review the local population profile to identify particular inequalities e. g. health within Huntingdonshire It is also important to consider the demographic make up of the District as key demographic and socio-economic characteristics are known to influence demand characteristics. For example certain age-groups are known to register higher participation rates in a number of sport and leisure activities; deprived communities often experience issues relating to access to services and opportunities; cultural backgrounds may result in some passive and active recreation pursuits being favoured over others; car ownership levels can impact on the range of facilities that can be accessed. A brief review of the key demographics (Source Census 2001 data) for the area shows that: Overall population: According to 2004 based population data (Government Actuary Department (GAD)) published in October 2007, the 2007 population for the District is 168,200, increasing to 188,400 by 2021. The GAD figures have been used as the basis for supply and demand modelling to inform the sports facilities strategy. The age structure of Huntingdonshire’s population is very similar to the averages for England in terms of the proportion of the population aged between 20 and 50 years. Huntingdonshire has a higher proportion of children, teenagers and adults aged 0-14, and 30-54 and a lower proportion of those aged 54 and over. 24. 4% of the population are aged between 30-44. Ethnicity. Huntingdonshire’s ethnic mix is the same as the national average with some 97% describing themselves as white. The next largest ethnic group (2. 8%) in Huntingdonshire is from black and minority ethnic groups (BME). Deprivation Indices. Huntingdonshire District is a predominantly prosperous area, benefiting from higher than average earnings, low unemployment and crime. However, the 2007 Indices of Deprivation show that of the 20% most deprived wards in Cambridgeshire, 11 are now in Huntingdonshire. These are Super Output Areas of which the most severe area of deprivation is Huntingdon North ward. The population density in Huntingdonshire is lower than the England average of 3. 87 (Office for National Statistics (ONS) data for 2005). This reflects the rural aspect of the area. 2. 4 2. 5 2. 6 2. 7 2. 8 2. 9 2. 10 Car Ownership –4% more households in the District have access to 2 or more cars than the England average. This very high rate reflects the rural nature of the District. Education Despite the District’s relative prosperity, in 2004 15% of school leavers left education with no qualifications; 25% of 16-74 year olds in the District have no formal qualifications. Department of Health – Local Authority Profile 2. 11 Local authority health profiles are designed to show the health of people in each local authority area, and include comparisons with other similar populations. Profiles are produced by Public Health Observatories and are updated annually. With other local information e. g. Community Plans, Local Area Agreements, these profiles demonstrate where action can be taken to improve people’s health and reduce inequalities. Key points extracted from the 2007 profiles covering Cambridgeshire include: Huntingdonshire †¢ †¢ It is estimated that in Huntingdonshire 1 adult in 4 eats healthily and 1 in 6 binge drinks. Although estimated smoking rates are below average, 1 adult in 5 still smokes Life expectancy for both men and women is higher than the England average 2. 12 Huntingdonshire District Sports Facility Strategy Draft Report March 2008 9 SECTION II –STRATEGIC CONTEXT †¢ †¢ †¢ †¢ Rates of early deaths from cancer are similar to those in England but have shown no improvement in trends over the last 4 years The rate of admission to hospital with alcohol specific conditions is lower than the England average CHD is a growing problem in the District Obesity levels, particularly amongst young people are also a growing issue Summary 2. 3 Huntingdonshire District is relatively affluent, but has small pockets of deprivation. There are high levels of employment and average wages are higher than other parts of the county, although some younger people lack formal qualifications. Life expectancy is high, and compared to some of the other more rural and urban areas, there are fewer serious health issues, with the exception of a growing incidence of CHD, and relatively high rates of cancer, experienced by the population. The District has a large younger population, and a high proportion of 30-44 year olds; this profile is important for sports provision, as individuals tend to be more active when younger.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Sexual and Maternal Instincts in James Fenimore Coopers Last of the Mohicans :: The Last of the Mohicans

Cora Munro's Sexual and Maternal Instincts in James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans Cora Munro's relationship with her younger, fairer sister Alice demonstrates a distinct mother-daughter pattern that manifests itself in every interaction between the two women. Throughout James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans, the character of Cora continuously hides her sister's face in her bosom as an indication of undying protection from the ravages of the American frontier. Alice depends on Cora as her champion and defender but, most unmistakably as a mother figure. Cora maintains a immutable position of motherly nurture with her sister, however, when interacting with other frontier characters, Cora shifts her style of human interaction towards a conscious understanding of her gender capacity. Though not overtly sexual, Cora does demonstrate a cognizance of female sexuality and feminine influence on various male characters. Cora does not often demonstrate motherly instinct while practicing the powers of her sex; rather, her authority particular to each sphere man ifests itself during situations of great conflict and tension concerning Alice or, separately, the other surrounding male characters. The narrator refers to Cora's motherly intuition in many instances, but most especially when Alice demonstrates a case of need or dependence. When Alice shows doubt and fear, Cora immediately rushes to protect and soothe her. Cooper writes, "For many moments the elder sister looked upon the younger, with a countenance that wavered with powerful and contending emotions. At length she spoke, though her tones had lost heir rich and calm fulness, in an expression of tenderness, that seemed maternal" (109). Cooper writes clearly of the strong bond that exists between the sisters while illustrating a power relationship that has Cora playing the role of shepherd and Alice as that of a small, helpless lamb. Moreover, Cooper repeatedly shows the character of Alice grasping onto the arm of Duncan Heyward†¹an obvious physical need for refuge and shield†¹while Cora remains free of an explicit male bond and receives the admiration of the remaining men from afar. Alice, the weaker of the two, appeals to her sister for attention while Cora remains aloof and confident. Cooper, at many instances, describes Cora with almost beatific characteristics which heighten her esteem and power as a female character. Her motherly feelings towards Alice verge on the saintly; Cora often rises above common human sensibility and takes on the role of a martyr in the manner that a mother would for her child.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Pest Analysis of Mcdonald

MKT 204 Principle of Marketing 2 Individual Assignment Fast food industry Swot Analysis Name: Ting Ze Kai ID: I11008551 Section: 5K1 Lecturer: Mr CHEAH SIN CHYE Table of Contents Company Background| 3| PEST Analysis | 4-9| 4Ps Strategies| 10-11| References| 12-13| Appendix| 14| Company Background McDonald is a largest chain of hamburger fast food restaurants in the world. Approximately 68 million customers in 119 countries daily are served. The birth of McDonald began with Raymond Albert Kroc.He found two brothers (Richard and Maurice McDonald) who run a hamburger restaurant and acquired the franchising right from them to run McDonald’s restaurant. In 1955, McDonald’s Corporation was founded by Ray Kroc and opened the first restaurant in Des Plaines, Illinois. In 1980, GOLDEN ARHCES RESTAURANTS SDN BHD gets the license to operate McDonald’s restaurant in Malaysia from McDonald’s Corporation USA in 1980. The first restaurant McDonald’s Malaysia opene d at Jalan Bukit Bintang, Kuala Lumpur. Now, it has more than 200 restaurants operated in Malaysia. PEST Analysis- McDonaldPolitical * Raising retirement age * Healthy Issue * Taxation| Economic * Exchange currencies * Economic growth * Interest rate| Social * Seek to better quality * Technology with teenagers | Technology * Online advertising * Mobile CRM * New technology | Political Raising retirement age According to the V. SHANKAR GANESH and EUNICE AU (2012), they stated that the retirement age for the public sector has already been raised to 60 by government. It can be a huge impact for the company. Normally, company paid high salary for the old workers which contain high skill and experience.For saving cost, company will recruit new worker which paid low salary to cover worker near retirement age. But, the retirement age has been increase and old worker still with high salary. It will lead the cost of labour increasing to the company. Healthy Issue According to the Audrey Edwa rds (2012), he stated that 35 major food and beverage(F&B) producer and fast food has been asked by the government to reduce the sugar and salt content in their product. It implies government will start to enhance the standard of requirement of the food and request fast food company emphasis on more healthy food.Therefore company should readjustment the standard of their food to reach the government requirement. It might affect the taste of their product and losing their customers. Taxation Prime Minister Dato Seri Najib in Budget 2012 announced franchise fee is now tax deductible in Malaysia. Those fees for franchise business they paid are allowable for tax deduction (NBC, 2011). It is good news for those franchise companies. Normally, a rise in corporation tax has the same effect as increase cost. Company will pass some of this tax on to consumer with higher price.Whereas, franchise business can use those fees they paid to deduce the tax from company. Therefore, the cost will be d ecrease and they can provide more value meal for their customer. Furthermore, they have more capital to find a new market such as hot drinks market, healthy food market and so on Economic Exchange currencies According to the The Star (2012), it mentioned that the ringgit climbed 3. 7% to 3. 0598, the biggest gain since the third quarter of 2010. A head of treasury at Bangkok Bank Bhd said that the currency is on a strengthening trend and could test 3. 3 to the dollar in the near term (The Star, 2012). It means that the exchange currency maintains at the high level and it will be increasing in the following. McDonald always imports most of its raw material such as beef and potatoes due to local market cannot supply in abundant to meet the demand of its products. Therefore, the strengthening of ringgit makes company cost of purchase decrease. Then, company is able to lower their product price and diversify their promotion tools to offer more value meal to attract customer.Economic gro wth According to The Star (2012), it mentioned that Malaysia’s economic growth remains strong and is at a comfortable level when compared with that of the global economy and the central bank has projected the Malaysian economy would grow at a steady 4%-5% this year anchored by resilient domestic demand. As the food slightly above normal foods, not many people will have the income range to consume the products. Moreover If the economy is bad and their income is affected, the demand of McDonald product will certainly going down.But Malaysia’s economic remains strong means Malaysian have more disposable income and they can spend more and more expensive food at fast food restaurant. Interest rate Malaysian interest rates currently at three per cent have remained accommodative (The Star, 2012). It could be a dangerous for the company. Businesses often need to take out short term loan to make up for shortfall in expenses, so higher interest rate makes such shortfalls more co stly, since the business will have to more interest back to lenders. Company also frequently take out longer term debt for improvement and infrastructure.The higher interest rate, they should face more costly on their debt. Therefore, they should lower their cost of production by using different way and strengthen their marketing strategies to gain more profit to overcome. Social Seek to better quality Malaysian quality of life index increased from 100 points for the base year 2000 to 111. 9 points in 2010 (The Star, 2012). When their quality of life is improved, they have higher expectation. They will start to want have quality in services and more conveniences that can differentiate one restaurant from another.All these needs should be considered by the company. If company haven’t noticed it yet, it will be difficult to gain competitive advantage in the market. Technology with teenagers According to the Joy Lee (2012), he mentioned that technology has no doubt brought about the luxury of convenience. Nowadays, even a toddler or kid is in tune with technology. It means that technology is changing the life style. Teenagers want technology in their life and facilities such as credit card payment, wireless internet and other attraction for their hangout and eating.So all these need should be considered by McDonald Company. Technology Online advertising During the height of the tech boom, online business is getting normal nowadays. It brings convenient to the customer and company. According to the Jack Komperday (2003), McDonald’s sat on the internet advertising side lines. This will get closer with their target market because teenagers get in touch with technology more. Compare with TV advertising, online advertising is more effective and cheaper. Furthermore, company are easier to spread their new products and news through their official website such as www.Mcdonal. com. my. Customer also can take order easily through their official websites. Mobi le CRM According to the Chantal Tode (2012), Mcdonald’s will introduce a mobile CRM program with the goal of rewarding customer and driving loyalty. The program involves using the Mowingo mobile application to notify customer about regional promotions and store-specific coupons that are exclusive to the app and the store issuing them such as they can get a free coffee or other through the app (Chantal Tode, 2012). This will lead cost saving for the company and attract more customers. New TechnologyTimes have changed and evolution of technology in the fast food industry is picking up the pace. According to the Kerry Pipes (n. d. ), touch-screen kiosks and self-checkout lanes will happen in fast food restaurants such as McDonald, Burger King and so on. These contactless payment kiosks often included colourful, animated touch-screen menus that give customer the option to browse through the entire menu, customize their order, and then pay with cash a credit card Kerry Pipes (n. d . ). It is very fantastic system for McDonald which is a fast food industry provide fast services.They give customer more freedom and convenient. It will increase the speed of service and ease long lines. Company also can cut their labour costs due to the machine has replaced labour work. 4P Strategies deal with issue Product For dealing the health issue, company can come up new menu with healthy food. McDonald’s specialise product is burger so they can come out a healthy hamburger, add salad and fruit with set meal or organic food. It will meet the requirement from government and open new market to attract healthy conscious customer.Furthermore, Malaysia’s economic is growing, Malaysian has more steady and disposable income and they will choose more expensive and quality food to satisfy them. Therefore, McDonald can adapt better raw material to produce products with high price and high quality such as triple burger, high quality beef burger and so on to satisfy custom er’s taste. Price In marketing mix, price is very important for a product. Due to the franchise fee is now tax deduction in Malaysia, McDonald are able to use more pricing strategies to position their products such as promotion price, value price, price skimming.But for the vegetarian burger and high quality beef burger, company can use pricing skimming method to set initial high price with them into market because they adapt high quality and healthy material to make it and then slowly lowers the price to make the product available to a wider market. It will position the healthy burger with high price high quality in people’s mind. In addition, exchange currencies issues bring the cost of production decrease and hence they can earn more profit. Promotion For the new launching of product, company can advertise new product with bar code.Customer scan the barcode with their smartphone, they can get free drinks with new product. Online advertising is getting normal nowaday s. Therefore, company can use various form of online marketing techniques such as banner advertisements, videos or social medial to promote their product. In addition, McDonald, social responsible company so they can expand their online advertising related with social responsible. It can build a positive image in the market. Furthermore, using CRM program maintains customer relationship and loyalty.McDonald has opportunity cooperate with mobile cooperation to wider their range of customers such as customer will get free coupons when they purchase certain brands mobile. Place Malaysians are starting to seek to better quality now. McDonald should increase their outlets nearby work place, bus station, and airport. Furthermore, they should increase their location of deliver service and provide training for their employee to build a faster and better service for their customer. For the new launching product such as high quality beef burger, they initially can only available few outlets w hich located upper middle class area.References * V. SHANKAR GANESH and EUNICE AU, 2012. Raising retirement age. Available at: http://www. nst. com. my/top-news/raising-retirement-age-1. 94353#. [Accessed on 19 June 2012] * Audery Edwards, 2012. Passion for food feeds disease. Available at: http://thestar. com. my/news/story. asp? file=/2012/4/15/nation/11069279&sec=nation. [Accessed on 19 June 2012] * The Star, 2012. Asian currencies complete quarterly gain. Available at: http://thestar. com. my/news/story. asp? file=/2012/4/15/nation/11069279&sec=nation [Accessed on 19 June 2012] * The Star, 2012.Minister: Economic growth stays strong. Available at: http://biz. thestar. com. my/news/story. asp? file=/2012/3/26/business/10986390&sec=business [Accessed on 19 June 2012] * The Star, 2012. Interest rates remain accommodative. Available at: http://biz. thestar. com. my/news/story. asp? file=/2012/3/21/business/20120321195459&sec=business [Accessed on 19 June 2012] * Joy Lee, 2012. Today ’s toddlers and kids are in tune with technology. Available at: http://thestar. com. my/metro/story. asp? file=%2F2012%2F6%2F2%2Fcentral%2F11395408&sec=central#.T8nYyO-wHmE. facebook [Accessed on 19 June 2012] * The Star, 2012. Report shows better quality of life in 2000-2010. Available at: http://thestar. com. my/news/story. asp? file=/2012/6/11/nation/20120611220429&sec=nation. [Accessed on 19 June 2012] * Tan Cheng Li, 2012. Malaysians do their part to protect the environment. Available at: http://thestar. com. my/lifestyle/story. asp? file=/2011/4/22/lifefocus/8485754&sec=lifefocus. [Accessed on 19 June 2012] * NBC, 2012. Franchisee fee is now tax deductible in Malaysia.Available at: http://www. nbc. com. my/blog/franchise-fee-tax-deductible-in-malaysia/. [Accessed on 19 June 2012] * Jack Komperda, 2003. Buying Time Online. Available at: http://www. usnews. com/usnews/culture/articles/031006/6ads. htm. [Accessed on 19 June 2012] * Chantal Tode, 2012. Mcdonald’s bit es into mobile CRM at over 500 locations this summer. Available at: http://www. mobilecommercedaily. com/2012/05/18/mcdonald%E2%80%99s-bites-into-mobile-crm-at-over-500-locations-this-summer. [Accessed on 19 June 2012] Appendix

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Japanese Anthropology Essay - 1772 Words

Prof. Bodoh-Creed Anth 338 – Section 1 February 27, 2012 On an ordinary Saturday afternoon, my sister and I made our way to 1st St. and Central Ave. from a failed attempt at another left-to-be-unnamed cultural epicenter, which was a very disappointing trip. Little Tokyo proved to be quite the opposite, as I was able to ascertain a much deeper understanding of the Japanese culture because of it, and at the same time was able to reflect on the differences and similarities of my Filipino heritage. From what I was able to gather, the Japanese and Filipino cultures have quite a few significant differences, but have more similarities than I originally anticipated. As the name would suggest, Little Tokyo is fairly little, with its†¦show more content†¦Furthermore, along 2nd Street one can find a Pinkberry and Japanese tavern sharing close proximity to one another, just one example of the comingled culture of Little Tokyo. We met many friendly people during our visit, but had the most luck getting interviews while we were in the shops an d making small talk with the workers and customers. The predominant religion in Little Tokyo is Buddhism, but sentiment varies widely depending on their connection to the Japanese culture and their age. I was told that there were a handful of temples scattered throughout the area, and according to an elderly female store owner many people find it very important to observe the religious decrees and go every Sunday to meditate. A younger Japanese woman who worked in one of the shops seemed to think otherwise, as she expressed that nobody really follows the customs anymore, but certainly like to profess it. She continued by saying, â€Å"The only time we really care is during funerals†, but during weddings they are seen in churches wearing American style gowns, bearing a mark of Judeo-Christian Western ideology. 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As an advocate against discriminatory attitudes, Benedict advocated for tolerance and individuality within social norms and expectations and sought to determine that each culture has its own moral imperatives. Considered her most famous written work, Patterns of Culture, Benedict explores the differencesRead MoreEtic And Emic Analysis On Suicide Terrorism1662 Words   |  7 PagesTerror which lasted over ten years. Another famous event in which an event of suicide terrorism was used was the attack during the Battle of Okinawa. This attack was with the use of a Kamikaze pilot. Kamikaze pilot is defined as â€Å"a member of a Japanese air attack corps in World War II assigned to make a suicidal crash on a target (such as a ship) (Kamikaze, n.d.). This battle started April 1, 1945, United State troops were making a huge push to the island of Okinawa (History.com, 2009). AfterRead MoreGlobalization and Culture Change1865 Words   |  8 Pagesethnography, globalization and the related process of modernization negatively affect the Japanese island community by causing the erosion of historical family member roles forever changing traditional family dynamics. Liza explains â€Å"eldest sons in small Japanese rural communities like this one are historically the inheritors of the family fields.†(2011:182). Because modernization implies urbanization, to younger Japanese citizens â€Å"the option of going to vocational school, or even college, and getting aRead MoreThe Theory Of Personality Traits1948 Words   |  8 Pagesparticipants completed the self-report Costa and McCrae’s (1992) NEO-PI-R version in English. While the German sample was administered the Ostendorf and Angleitner’s (2004) German self-report version. Finally, the participants from the Japanese sample completed the Japanese self-report version developed by Yoshimure et al. (1998). Yomagata and colleagues (2006) explained that one of the limitations of their study were that the etic approach was used to assess personality across cultures and they suggestedRead MoreCultural Issues of Human Resource Management4615 Words   |  19 PagesInternational Journal of Evidence Based Coaching and Mentoring Vol. 5. No. 2 August, 2007 Page 45 Carrying Cultural Baggage: the contribution of socio-cultural anthropology to cross-cultural coaching Barbara St Claire-Ostwald, CINCRA International Coaching Training Consultancy, UK Email Contact: barbara@cincra.com Abstract This study examines the cultural awareness of professionals working in organisations. Given the multicultural nature of today’s workforce, it is becoming increasingly important

Saturday, December 28, 2019

Graduation Speech Middle Class - 944 Words

In our current economic recession, the term â€Å"middle class† is almost non-existent in everyday vocabulary. The so-called middle class was a term that was used to describe the people in our society who were not part of the rich and wealthy class, but was also higher up in the socioeconomic ladder above the poverty line. Now the term isn’t used as much as other terms like, â€Å"hard working taxpayers† or â€Å"everyday Americans† (Chozick). Today, it s not as easy as just working hard, you now need money and experience in order to get anywhere in this society. That also might sound easy, but the problem is that in order to get a job that will help you sustain your life you need work experience, but in order to get work experience you need a job. Most people don’t accept volunteers anymore in order to just gain some experience in a field. Jobs want you to have years of relatable work experience as soon as you finish college. One solution that can help this process of being able to help fix the economy and the middle class is to start making more entry level jobs. If we were to create a job that was at minimum wage that can be used as a temporary place where people can gain experience in order to move on. The only problem with this would be that businesses aren’t going to want to hire more people for a job when they could just pay one person to do it. So in order to give the businesses incentive to hire more people, the government would give incentives to businesses that could give themShow MoreRelatedRhetorical Analysis Of Maya Angelou s I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings 1036 Words   |  5 PagesFily Thiam English 002 Mrs. Vilato 9 April 2015 Rhetorical Analysis on â€Å"Graduation† by Maya Angelou In Graduation, a chapter in her autobiography â€Å"I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings†, Maya Angelou talks vividly about her middle school graduation in the segregated South. Graduation is an important milestone in most people’s life, as they get a degree and move on to their next level, something better and more important, with the hope that they can use their new knowledge to achieve their life goals andRead MoreGraduation by Maya Angelou Critique1386 Words   |  6 PagesDanielle Davis Eileen Thompson English 121 SL May 9, 2012 â€Å"Graduation† Critique â€Å"Graduation† was written by Maya Angelou in 1969. Angelou was born in Missouri, but after her parents divorced, she was sent to live with her grandmother in Stamps, Arkansas. While in Arkansas, Angelou attended the Lafayette County Training School. The school is the setting for her essay â€Å"Graduation.† Angelou graduated from eighth grade at Lafayette with top honors and went on to graduate from high school. AfterRead MoreClassification Essay Students682 Words   |  3 PagesBeing a student in today’s society holds an immense amount of pressure to do one thing: graduate. Thirteen years of school prepare students for the next major steps of their lives. Every student faces many struggles and frustrations before graduation day arrives. One may be able to surmise a few details about a student before they put pencil to paper or even speak. One can also make assumptions about a student based on his or her seating position. Motivation, determination, and concentration willRead MoreSeparation of Church and State685 Words   |  3 Pagesfuture, which leads to graduation ceremonies and bachelors or associates degrees. The separation of church and state within education is becoming more of a problem than it ever has been. For Nathan Bishop Middle School in Rhode Island, their graduation was just like any other ceremony, except for one thing: a rabbi was invited to give a thoughtful and respectful speech to the graduating class. Traditionally, the principle is to invite a clergy member to offer prayer at graduation ceremonies. NormallyRead MoreMy Speech - Original Writing975 Words   |  4 PagesWhen I began writing my commencement speech I knew that I wanted to use humor as a main theme. When we watched the speech examples in class the ones that I really took material away from and the ones that stuck with me the longest were the ones that were funny and had humor sprinkled throughout. Other than the humor part I had no idea what I wanted my speech to be about but I knew that I needed to stick with a common theme throughout or it would be a mess. Once I had the reoccurring dream aboutRead MoreTeaching Human Sexuality in the High School Curriculum1338 Words   |  5 Pages Facts of the Potential Litigation On August of 2011, Chancellor Dennis Walcott announced that all middle and high schools will be required to teach compulsory sexual health education as part of the core curriculum. Required Health classes focusing on human sexuality are provided as mandated at Edward R. Murrow high school. Some of the topics of this course include but are not limited to the following: HIV/AIDS, practicing of safe sex, sexually transmitted diseases, description of both male andRead MoreA Curriculum For All K 12 Grades1129 Words   |  5 Pagescurriculum to include middle and high schools. The middle school, considered grades sixth through eighth, must provide the instruction for all curriculum in section 74.1. It also states that just like the elementary curriculum of section 74.2, districts must allow sufficient time for teachers to teach the TEKS and students the adequate time to learn the TEKS in order to support student achievement of grade level and/or course requirements. This section also beg an requiring middle school students toRead MoreAnalysis Of Left Handed Commencement Address1064 Words   |  5 PagesThe speech that I chose to analyze is called, â€Å"A Left-Handed Commencement Address† by Ursula K. Le Guin who was a science fiction writer, and has many honorary and awards. She was offered to give this speech for the Mills college class of 1983 for a way to speak in public in the language of women. As I chose my speech, I often thought of why this speech was called a, â€Å"left-handed commencement address†. It comes from one of the novels that this specific person wrote called, â€Å"The left-hand of darkness†Read Moregraduation speech1882 Words   |  8 Pagesgood speech for an elementary graduation would depend on who is going to be doing the speaking. For a teacher, youll want to make sure you thank the students for all of their hard work and wish them the best in the next grade they move up to. For kids, they can thank their teacher fo r a good year and thank their parents for their support.This page contains a funny sample speech for Middle School or Elementary School graduations for principles, teachers or other key note speakers. The speech templateRead MoreTeaching Context Description Of Henrico County Essay810 Words   |  4 Pagesstudents and is home to 46 elementary schools, 12 middle schools, and 9 high schools, 2 tech centers, and 3 program centers, making it the sixth largest public school division in Virginia. 45 of the 72 schools in Henrico County are fully accredited by the Virginia Department of Education and comply with the Virginia Standards of Accreditation and the Virginia Standards of Learning. In 2015 there were 3,381 graduates and HCPS had a 90% on time graduation rate. Henrico County’s vastness contributes to

Thursday, December 19, 2019

John Steinbeck s Of Mice And Men - 1429 Words

Many people have dreamed on achieving the american dream but few have achieved it. In the novel Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck, Steinbeck writes a marvelous story about the hardship of achieving the unobtainable american dream. Steinbeck describes the elusive american dream in Of Mice and Men by comparing and contrasting the american dream with the characters in the novel. The american dream has many interpretations depending on who you ask. Some might say the american dream came from the declaration of independence but I consider the first true interpretation of the american dream came from James Truslow Adams. The american dream according to James Truslow Adams, in his book The Epic of America states that: â€Å"The American Dream is that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement. It is a difficult dream for the European upper classes to interpret adequately, and too many of us ourselves have grown weary and mistrustful of it. It is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position† ( James Truslow Adams, pg 214) Adams was one of the first to interpret the american dream to the public and he wrote his bookShow MoreRelatedJohn Steinbeck s Of Mice And Men1248 Words   |  5 PagesIn Steinbeck s novel Of Mice and Men, He uses imagery many times to create a realistic setting and plot. Steinbeck’s depiction of migrant workers and their daily complications during the depression are objectively precise due to his use of imagery with idioms, dreams, nature, loneliness and animal imagery. The main theme of the book transpires to be loneliness and fate. While George and Lennie, the main characters have a synergetic relationship, fate steps in and does away with their dreams, whichRead MoreJohn Steinbeck s Of Mice And Men897 Words   |  4 Pagesthat we possess. Many people feel certain emotions based on events that have taken place in their lifetime or how they were raised throughout their childhood. In John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men, he portrays the feelings of isolation and loneline ss in three different characters. George’s isolation is illustrated in Steinbeck’s, Of Mice and Men. George expresses many hard feelings towards Lennie at the opening of this story. â€Å"‘...you’re a lot of trouble,’ said George. ‘I could get along so easy and soRead MoreJohn Steinbeck s Of Mice And Men1243 Words   |  5 Pagesis what John Steinbeck achieves by portraying this through the characters in his novella Of Mice and Men. The main characters are affected by loneliness in their own different way throughout the novella. rf The loneliness is maintained by the challenges that the characters have to face, and they sustain those challenges of being inhumane towards each other. Crook, a figure in the story who experiences discrimination encounters the challenge of race, due to the book’s setting in the 1930’s duringRead MoreJohn Steinbeck s Of Mice And Men1080 Words   |  5 Pagesâ€Å"I want you to stay with me Lennie. Jesus Christ, somebody’d shoot you for a coyote if you was by yourself.† The novel Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck shows the relationship between two migrant workers in the 1930s, George and Lennie, along with the other members on the new ranch that they began working on. Georgie and Lennie dreamed of following the American Dream and owning their own patch of land and the novel revolves around the dream and the obstacles that stand in their way. Lennie, a strongRead MoreJohn Steinbeck s Of Mice And Men2167 Words   |  9 Pagesjobs. In John Steinbeck’ s Of Mice and Men, George Milton and Lennie Small wander through California in search of a new job that would help them make enough money to live their American dream on â€Å"the fatta the lan’†(Steinbeck 14). George and Lennie’s hard work and determination is not enough for them to live their dream. Lennie has a mental disability that slows the two friends down from living their dream; they have to run from job to job because of Lennie’s unintentional actions. Steinbeck incorporatesRead MoreJohn Steinbeck s Of Mice And Men1286 Words   |  6 PagesThe realistic fiction novella Of Mice And Men by John Steinbeck explains the journey of two migrant farm workers. Lennie and George are forced to overcome the Dust Bowl and The Great Depression around 1938. This makes jobs even harder to come by because everyone wanted one. Lennie and George were kicked out of Weed and they now work at a ranch in Soledad. At the new farm the friendship between Lennie and George becomes harder to maintain. The people on the farm are all different shapes, sizes, andRead MoreJohn Steinbeck s Of Mice And Men1448 Words   |  6 Pages In the novella, Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck discusses the idea of loneliness and how people who work at the ranch have no family and no future in lives. He indicates that all people at the ranch are lonely, but he specifically uses a few characters to highlight their state of being lonely and more miserable than the others. He emp hasizes the loneliness of ranch life during the Great Depression, and shows how people are willing to try and find friendship in order to escape from the state ofRead MoreJohn Steinbeck s Of Mice And Men1360 Words   |  6 Pagesfeeling, thinking and acting in everyday life. In the story Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck, a duo of farmers, George and Lennie, search for work wherever they can. Their dream of having a farm of their own is coming into reach, while George has to wield Lennie away from the temptation of Curley’s wife and the reality of what Lennie can do. John Steinbeck uses characterization to illustrate the nature of human existence. Steinbeck portrays George as a man who tries to help, and helps others soRead MoreJohn Steinbeck s Of Mice And Men1205 Words   |  5 Pagesand the time period of John Steinbeck s novella, Of Mice and Men, exemplifies the idea that people from minorities are held back from achieving their version of the ‘American Dream’. This goes to prove not everyone will overcome the overbearing tidal waves of their hardships, which makes the American Dream nothing more than a dream to them. Crooks, the black stable hand, faces discrimination due to his skin color as this unfortunately was common in the 1930’s. John Steinbeck uses Crooks’ situationRead MoreJohn Steinbeck s Of Mice And Men968 Words   |  4 PagesSolidifying the theme of John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men, the protagonist George expresses his significant loneliness despite a strong kinship with his friend Lennie, â€Å"’I ain’t got no people†¦ I seen the guys that go around the ranches alone. That ain’t no good’† (41). Published in 1937, amidst the horrific turmoil of the Great Depression, Steinbeck’s novella struck a sensitive chord with readers. Set in the heart of California’s Central Valley, this story follows two men, George and Lennie, as they